Over 80,000 out-of-school youths in northeast Nigeria have been forced to remain at home by Boko Haram terrorists who burnt and destroyed their schools.

There is some cheering news as they are getting basic education and psycho-social support.

This support is coming from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and it is for youths from five conflict affected states in northeast Nigeria.

It will cost over $24 million.

A statement by the U.S. Embassy in Abuja quoted, USAID Mission Director, Stephen Haykin, as giving the figure and a progress at the Education Crisis Response (ECR) activities in Bauchi and Maiduguri, Borno.

He said that many of the children and youth, especially the physically challenged who had been traumatised by violence, were unable to access mainstream education.

According to him through the ECR activity, USAID in conjunction with state governments and civil society organisations established 1,400 non-formal learning centres.

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The centre he said focused on teaching literacy and basic math, and provided socio-emotional learning activities to counter the negative effects of violent extremism, strengthen participants’ resilience, and build trust.

He said that more than 800 instructors, known as learning facilitators, were trained to staff the centres.

“The three-year, $24.7 million activity was implemented through a collaborative effort involving USAID, state governments and civil society organizations.

“This is done with traditional and religious leaders, community coalitions, International Rescue Committee, Florida State University, the Civil Society Action Coalition on Education for All, and the Federation of Muslim Women Society in Nigeria.

“The Education Crisis Response activity helped to answer widespread demand for quality secular, primary education in northeast Nigeria,” he said.

Also Read: 1.6m IDPs In Northeast Gets UNFPA Supports

According to him, the U.S. will maintain its commitment to marginalised children and youth in the northeast.

One of the beneficiaries of the programme in Bauchi, Lillian, 14, said learning had become enjoyable again.

“I am enjoying school now”.

“When I attended previous schools, there was no peace.  Now we can give our full attention to the class.  We can concentrate and understand what is being taught.

“I will study hard, and hope someday to achieve my ambition of becoming a nurse,” she was quoted as saying.

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