The interest of the Western world in Africa is certainly growing and Nigeria is one nation with an attractive population.

Even Harvard Business School now has a course, Africa Rising, that now exposes students to the African dream and the future of the continent.

It is a new course and Nigeria’s Vice President, Professor Yemi Osinbajo, is in the U.S. to deliver a lecture at the Harvard University, Boston, U.S. on “Africa Rising”.

Osinbajo, while at Harvard, would also engage in marathon meetings at the Ivy League school.

Harvard described the lecture as a historic moment, as it would be the first time that an Africa-focused course would be offered at Harvard Business School.

READ MORE INTERESTING STORIES FOR FREE. DOWNLOAD BOUNCE NEWS APP HERE

In extending the invitation to Osinbajo, Harvard noted that it deeply admired the immense progress that Nigeria has made under the administration of President Muhammadu Buhari.

The university specifically noted the work of the Presidential Enabling Business Environment Council, which the vice-president chairs.

The university said: “It would be the highest honour for us were you to accept our invitation as we deeply admire the immense progress that Nigeria has made during your tenure.

“Not only as the country’s Vice President, but also as Chairman of the Presidential Enabling Business Environment Council.

“By all accounts, this Council has spearheaded crucial initiatives and we very much hope that you will speak to those, as well as to Nigeria’s rise in world economic rankings and the vast range of business initiatives that are ongoing in your country”.

Also Read: Osinbajo To Ortom: 'You Lied Over Benue Killings'

The vice-president is expected to highlight the progress made by the present administration in improving the country’s economy and investment climate.

Osinbajo had in October 2016 delivered a lecture at the university - ‘Nigeria in the World’.

The vice-president spoke on: ‘Destroying Boko Haram and the Rebuilding of Nigeria’s North-East’.

ALSO WATCH: WHY IT'S STILL UNCOMMON FOR INVESTORS TO FUND TECH START-UPS