Demola left his profitable job in the United Kingdom and sold everything he had to return to Nigeria on a promise that he would receive a more lucrative offer. Armed with a Bachelor’s Degree in Mathematics and a Masters in Risk Management from Glasgow Caledonian University, he did not foresee any obstacle in Naija.

"One month passed, two, three, four, five and then six months; the job did not materialise. So many details that I cannot begin to tell you here. After about six months without a job, I had to look for alternative source of income, as I was fast running out of cash.

“So, I turned my car into a kabu kabu on one of the e-hailing services on the partner/driver arrangement. I earned between 65,000 Naira to 70,000 Naira weekly after the company had deducted its commission. I basically did about 7 to 8 hours a day and about 10 hours on weekends. I would have made more if I had put in more hours," he said.

Demola also told Bounce News that a major obstacle most graduates resident in Nigeria face are their psychological limitations and belief in the society’s confused definition of success.

"One of my major concerns initially was the dignity. But I realised that the company I partnered with, subconsciously creates an atmosphere of mutual respect between passengers and drivers.

"During the trips, we are saved from a few 'hotheads'. Majority of your riders will readily treat you with respect.

"There are several things this technology has done. First, it has started to change what work really means. It would have been difficult for people like us to get onto the yellow cab as drivers.

"But with this technology, you get to make money as a cab driver without branding it, which is a bit more dignifying than driving the yellow cab," added Demola who has returned to the UK.

According to Demola, "the cab driving was a way of looking inwards to see what I could do with what I had. It was my first shot at entrepreneurship. It was quite profitable and dignifying."

Kabu Kabu was my saving grace after I lost my bank

Unlike Demola who abandoned a job for a phantom better one in Nigeria, 42-year-old Essien lost his bank job in July, 2016. In 3 months, Essien's former employer had to let go of over 400 staff.

"It was a huge shock. I didn't see it coming," Essien told Bounce News in an interview.

Essien had faith that his 8 years of experience in the banking sector would speak volumes for him during interviews. So, he started applying. Hours turned to days, days to months and his self-denial began to fade away. With a wife and two children to feed, he needed to act fast!

One morning as he drove his children to school, a jingle about an e-hailing service started playing on the radio. He quickly read more about it, downloaded the app and started the on-boarding process.

"I had always enjoyed driving. But I had never considered the possibility of earning a living from it. I had everything that the Taxi company was looking out for. I had the education, the experience and the right vehicle - a 2010 Sedan which I bought two years earlier. In less than a week, I was fully boarded and I hit the road," Essien explained.

The first week, Essien told Bounce News he earned 60,000 Naira excluding expenses and deductions by the taxi company.

"But from the third week, I had begun to average between 75,000 Naira and 85,000 Naira as I put in more hours, my income stabilised in that range ever since," he said smiling broadly.

"There are several things this technology has done. First, it has started to change what work really means. It would have been difficult for people like us to get onto the yellow cab as drivers.

"But with this technology, you get to make money as a cab driver without branding it, which is a bit more dignifying than driving the yellow cab," said Essien who plans to buy more kabu Kabu as an investment in the e-hailing service.

All that glitters is not gold

Unlike Essien and Demola that owned their vehicles, the business may not be as rosy for those who drive other people’s cars.

Thomas falls into this category. He is a graduate of Mass Communication from Moshood Abiola Polytechnic. He had worked two jobs since graduating in 2011 but none of it ever left him with any savings after transportation and feeding.

"It was my uncle who got his friend who puts vehicles in one of the hailing services, to give me a vehicle. I started driving about six months ago.

"Although I am still learning the system, I can tell you it pays more to those people who drive their own vehicles.

"I must remit 45,000 Naira to the owner of the vehicle every week. I still buy fuel at 145 Naira per litre and pay the company more than 20% as commission on every trip.

"If you do the Math, there will be little left for me. But it is still better than doing a 50,000 Naira job.

"Some weeks are better than others, and I get to keep as much as 25,000 Naira to 30,000 Naira every week,” Thomas explained.