History as a subject is coming back to Nigeria’s secondary schools.

The National Council on Education approved the reintroduction of the subject into the curriculum for primary and secondary schools across Nigeria.

It was announced by the Chief Executive of the Teachers Registration Council of Nigeria (TRCN) , Professor Josiah Ajiboy.

The decision to bring back the subject was agreed at a meeting in Kano State, Professor Ajiboy told reporters in Abuja.

“The NCE held a meeting last week in Kano State where it also agreed that History should be re-introduced into the curriculum,” he said.

One way to ensure proficiency in teaching of subjects in Nigeria will be to eliminate quacks among teachers in different foundational levels and Professor Ajiboy said the Council was also working hard to achieve this.

“At the TRCN, we have also taken measures to eliminate quacks among our teachers.

“The council successfully distributed Teachers Bio-data forms to the 774 Local Government Areas of the country.

“The Bio-data will help to know the numbers of subject teachers and where they are located across the country and this will address the disproportionate distribution of teachers.

“Within a year, we registered an additional 130,645 teachers to bring total of registered teachers to 1.8 million. We also inducted 29,381 teachers at the point of their graduation,” Ajiboye stated.

The TRCN will also conduct a Professional Qualifying Examination for about 15,000 teachers in October, according to the official of the council.

“Within a year, we registered an additional 130,645 teachers to bring total of registered teachers to 1.8million. We also inducted 29,381 teachers at the point of their graduation,” Ajiboye said.

According to Professor Ajiboy, there is still a shortage of qualified teachers for the country’s population, but the Council would ensure teachers take qualification examination, which he hopes will help restore sanity to the teaching profession and eliminate quacks.

On the resolution on allowing Religious Studies to stay alone, he said: “We were aware of the issues regarding Religious Studies in the present curriculum, which were recently resolved.

“But, as the government said, the decision to join the religious subjects was reached during the previous administration”.