The holy month of Ramadan has come to an end and now, Muslims across the globe are set to begin their Eid celebrations.

Below are 5 interesting facts about Eid al-Fitr:

IT'S HELD TO CELEBRATE THE END OF FASTING

Eid al-Fitr is an important religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting.

Muslims fast from before sunrise to a little after sunset during the month of Ramadan.

This is the month in which the Qur’an was revealed to Prophet Muhammad (SAW).

The prolonged fasting isn't just about food—it also includes abstaining from taking medications, drinking any liquids (including water), smoking, and sex.

The holiday celebrates the end of the month on the Islamic calendar, as well as the end of the fasting.

THE NAME OF THE HOLIDAY IS A LITERAL TRANSLATION

"Eid al-Fitr" is a pretty literal translation of the event that's being celebrated: "Festival of the Breaking of the Fast," or "the Feast of Fast-Breaking."

IT'S ALSO KNOWN AS THE LESSER EID

Eid al-Fitr is one of two important Eid celebrations in the Muslim faith. The other is Eid al-Adha, the Feast of the Sacrifice or "Greater Eid."

Eid al-Adha celebrates the sacrifice Ibrahim (Abraham) was willing to make to Allah. Like Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha is held at a different time on the Gregorian calendar every year.

TYPICALLY, THE EID AL-FITR LAST FOR 3 DAYS

Traditionally, the festival lasts for 3 days. However, depending on how it falls on the calendar, the festivities and parties can last longer.

THERE ARE THE PRAYERS OF EID

For Muslims, this is one of the most significant dates on the calendar, and is marked by performing a special Eid prayer, exchanging gifts, and gathering with friends and loved ones to share a feast.